Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Your place to talk about your Bootle memories
lynne99
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Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:22 pm

Oh dear Joe, the demon drink again. It seems to be a good way of getting away with anything, including Murder. :(
Thanks for posting, I like my "bite sized" portions
Shelagh
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Thu Apr 04, 2019 12:05 am

Poor man, definitely in the wrong place at the wrong time..knife crime just as bad, back then!
Seems we never learn!

Thanks Joe :)
lynne99
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Thu Apr 04, 2019 9:13 am

Shelagh, did you go to the girl's grammar in the 60s?
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:04 pm

Thanks for your comments Lynne, and Shelagh they are much appreciated.
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Thu Apr 04, 2019 7:16 pm

No Lynne, different person, I was at St James until 1963 :)

(Bite sized pieces better for me also :wink: )
lynne99
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Fri Apr 05, 2019 2:06 pm

Oh well, it was worth a try.
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fatboyjoe90
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Sun Apr 07, 2019 1:48 am

I received this link from my friend Robert.


The bandaged killer soldier
When soldier Samuel Morgan raped and murdered 15-year-old Mary Hagan he left behind a vital clue - a bandage which he had used to tend his injured thumb.
On the evening of 2nd November 1940, Mary disappeared while buying a newspaper and cigarettes for her father in Waterloo, north of Liverpool.

Search parties were set up and that same night Mary's body was found in a concrete blockhouse which was used as an anti-invasion fortress. In the muddy vicinity was a clear impression of a boot heel, an army bandage which had been used to treat a thumb wound which was stained with zinc ointment, as well as a chocolate bar wrapper containing traces of zinc ointment. It was found that Mary had eaten this chocolate bar, meaning whoever had worn the bandage had come into contact with Mary.

The conclusion was that of the wearer of the bandage could be found, then the police had the killer.
There were thousands of troops stationed in the North West, but a waitress came forward to say a soldier with a cut on his face had asked her if he could clean up in her house, claiming to have been in a fight. A month earlier, a cyclist Anne McVittie, had been robbed by a soldier on a canal bank a mile from where Mary was killed and the descriptions in both incidents were familiar.

17 days after the murder, Irish guard Sam Morgan was being held in London over the McVittie robbery and had a healed scar on his thumb. Morgan's house in Seaforth was searched and a bandage cloth was found which matched that from the murder scene. Soil samples from there were also found on his uniform. Witnesses identified Morgan as having been seen near the scene of the crime and a local pub landlord said he had been in his pub the same night, sporting a bloodstained cap. Morgan's boots matched a cast taken from the footprint found next to the body.
Faced with this evidence, Morgan admitted robbing cigarettes and money from Mary but denied rape and murder. He was found guilty without much deliberation and hanged on 4th April 1941.

________________________________________

A missing teenager
The night of 2 November 1940 was cold and damp. 15-year-old Mary Hagan was running an errand for her parents, getting them a copy of the Liverpool Echo and a packet of cigarette papers.
When Mary failed to return, her family contacted the police, who immediately began to search for the missing teenager.
The scene of the crime

The next day Mary Hagan’s body was found lying just inside an unmanned wartime pillbox, on the bridge close to Mary’s house. Among the people called to the scene was Dr James Firth, head of the
Home Office forensic science lab at Preston. Scouring the area for clues, he saw that as well as a newspaper and a half-eaten bar of chocolate, a small piece of fabric lay near to the body. It was a muddy and bloodstained bandage. He could also see a bloody thumbprint on one side of the young girl’s bruised neck. The post mortem revealed that Mary had died as a result of asphyxiation.
The bloodstained bandage

A woman came forward to say that late on the night of the murder she had been asked the way to the barracks by a soldier. She had noticed that there were scratches on his face.
When the police questioned officers at the Royal Seaforth barracks, they came up with a suspect. Samuel Morgan was a local man and a private in the Irish Guard. He was already suspected of being involved in an attack on a woman but had deserted two months earlier. Morgan’s family were questioned and admitted to harbouring him while he had been AWOL from the army. He had stayed with an older brother and his wife.

Crucially, she told police she remembered that Morgan had cut his thumb on 31 October, two days before the killing of Mary Hagan. She had dressed this wound, applying a bandage and zinc ointment taken from Morgan’s army field dressing kit. Laboratory tests established that the piece of bandage found at the murder scene matched it exactly. Morgan was found guilty of murder and executed on 4 April 1941.


Mary Hagan 15, The Victim.

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Samuel Morgan on his way to court dressed in military uniform.

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http://www.britishexecutions.co.uk/exec ... l%20Morgan
Cheers Joe.
lynne99
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Sun Apr 07, 2019 10:48 am

Thanks Joe. No drink mentioned. I wonder. Poor girl , just goinnng on an errand, as we all did.
Shelagh
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Sun Apr 07, 2019 7:02 pm

Joe, I recognised this case immediately, my lovely old neighbour, Jessie Chapman (now deceased) remembered the murder vividly, said it was the talk of everywhere...midwives in attendance at her home birth were talking of nothing else!
As if that wasn’t bad enough, Ack Ack guns were going off just across the road from her parlour window, phew!
How did they ever get through it all :(
Mary Hagan must have taken that route many times, all without incident, but tragically, this time the murderer was lurking, Mary’s young life taken in such a cruel evil way..her parents must have been devastated!

Thanks Joe and Robert :)
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fatboyjoe90
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Mon Apr 08, 2019 4:03 pm

Thanks for your replies Lynne and Shelagh, :wink: :) What did you think of that site that I used for the Mary Hagan case.
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Mon Apr 08, 2019 5:44 pm

Hi Joe; yes, very good site indeed, tends to be more informative than older reports, definitely goes into greater detail.
Still enjoy reading the old style news reports though, perhaps I’ve just got used to them :)

Two different formats of reporting, both equally as interesting as the other :)
A professional researcher would probably opt for the National Archives site; rest of us equally happy with either!

Shelagh :D
lynne99
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Mon Apr 08, 2019 5:46 pm

Yes Shelagh, I would say the same, but just come back from work and my feet are hurting.
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu Apr 11, 2019 10:51 pm

Thanks for your feedback Lynne and Shelagh, sorry I'm a bit late in replying to them. :wink: :D
Cheers Joe.
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu Apr 11, 2019 10:57 pm

Hatchet Killing.

A woman in Everton who killed a man by hitting him over the head with a hatchet was sentenced to fifteen years imprisonment.

On the morning of 8th July 1901 coal heaver, Luke Crean went to Canada Dock to try and find some work but was unsuccessful. He and his friends then spent several hours drinking in pubs before going to the home of one of them in Adelaide Place around 3.30pm.

Adelaide Place, as it is today.
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A disturbance broke out in the street between two rival religious factions and Crean went out to get involved and he ended up fighting with a man named Thomas Jenkins whose wife also got involved, striking him with a slipper. There was a large crowd watching including 24-year-old Annie Turner, who was pointing to her chest and shouting 'True Blue' and 'No Surrender.' She then went into her house and got a hatchet, hitting Crean on the head with two blows.
As shouts of police went up Crean and Jenkins fell into the cellar and when an officer pulled him out of there, he managed to escape and run away. Turner returned to her house with the hatchet and despite being a Protestant herself said to a neighbour 'I have helped to kill one Orangeman and I will kill another.' Crean did not manage to get far, collapsing with blood coming out of his ear. He was taken to the Northern Hospital where he slipped into unconsciousness and died that evening.

Mr Justice Ridley
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An inquest on 10th July returned a verdict of wilful murder against Turner and she was committed for trial at the next assizes, which were just three weeks away. On 1st August she appeared before Mr Justice Ridley, her defence counsel arguing that Crean's injuries were a result of the fall. The jury found her guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter and she was sentenced to fifteen years penal servitude.










http://liverpoolmurders.blogspot.com
Cheers Joe.
lynne99
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Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:22 pm

Thanks again Joe. It is nice of you to comment on our responses, but for my part, no apology is necessary for being late. Why on earth would a woman go and get a hatchet and hit someone with it. Unbelievable !!
Shelagh
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Sat Apr 13, 2019 9:55 pm

Poor housing, sanitation, low pay, most of which spent on ale and tobacco. bad living standards create high mortality rates, (especially for the Irish) Can understand why they felt so passionate about their beliefs, most Irish families having precious little else to believe in!
So close to the 12th July - trouble between the two groups would have been brewing - sounds like Crean was in the wrong place at the wrong time.
Don’t know what was going on with hatchet woman :shock: (headcase)

Joe. same thought as Lynn, nothing to apologise for, you always acknowledge our comments.
And as my dear mother would say; manners cost nothing, and manners maketh the man :) :wink:
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fatboyjoe90
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Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:12 am

Thanks for your comments Lynne and Shalagh, I really do appreciate them. :wink: :D
Cheers Joe.
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fatboyjoe90
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Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:18 am

Baby Sent as Luggage Dies

A mother who inexplicably posted her sleeping baby in a box to Liverpool was arrested and charged with murder, but eventually sentenced to just six months in prison.

Hoop and Crown Preston.
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On Saturday 6th March 1858 Jane Parker called at the house of Elizabeth Eaves in Ormskirk Road, Preston, saying she needed help as she had gone into labour. The following day she gave birth to a baby boy which was perfectly healthy and Mrs Eaves allowed her to stay for a bit longer. On the Tuesday 33-year-old Parker paid Elizabeth for some frocks she had made for the baby, then left saying she was returning to a farm where she had employment.

Parker instead went to a furniture broker in Friargate and bought a box, asking the broker to address the box to a Mrs Eldon at 6 Harrison Street off Scotland Road. That afternoon, Parker placed the baby in the box after first having given it some gin to make it sleep. She then went to the Hoop and Crown Inn and gave a labourer named Henry Hall 3d to take the locked box to the parcels office at the railway station and dispatch it to Liverpool. Only then did she go to the farm where she worked, which was in fact owned by her parents in Much Hoole.

A few hours later a van driver called at 6 Harrison Street with the box, but a Mrs Regan who lived there said she knew nothing about it, but there was a Mrs Melville who lived nearby and perhaps there had been some confusion. The following morning, after being told of the attempted delivery, an intrigued Mrs Melville went to the parcel office at Lime Street. After the shock of discovering its contents was a dead baby, she was then taken into custody whilst further inquiries were made.

With Henry Hall being traced as the sender of the box, he gave what information he could in respect of having been given it by a young woman. When the Much Hoole policeman noticed that Parker had returned to her parent's home without any baby having clearly been pregnant the week before, he decided to knock and see what she had to say. When Parker answered the door at 5 pm on Friday 12th March and saw a policeman standing there, she ran to a cupboard and took out a bottle of laudanum, but the officer was able to prevent her drinking it.

Parker was arrested and placed in the Preston Bridewell and at first, she denied having even given birth. Hall was then taken to identify her and when a medical examination was ordered she confessed to her actions and claimed that a traveller had told her a child could survive in the box for two days. Asked about her reasoning for addressing the box the way she had, she could not give a satisfactory answer, saying only that she knew there was an Eldon Street in Liverpool. This information was then sent to the Liverpool police, who were now satisfied that Mrs Melville had just been extremely unlucky and had nothing to do with the affair, meaning she was released from custody.

On 16th March an inquest was held before the Borough Coroner Mr P F Curry. He praised the vigilance of Detective Caryle from Liverpool and the efforts of the Head Constable at Preston for 'bringing a great mass of evidence into one unbroken chain, link by link, one end resting upon the body of the child and the other under the control of this woman calling herself Jane Parker.' Saying that as it was not clear who the box was meant for, nor how long it would be before it was opened, he concluded that the destruction of life was certain once she had put the baby into the box. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Parker, who was unable to be present as she was seriously ill with a heavy cold brought about by her long walk in the snow so soon after giving birth.

Parker appeared before Baron Martin on 29th March, where the prosecution allowed her to plead guilty to manslaughter rather than try her for wilful murder. She was then sentenced to just six months imprisonment with hard labour.














http://liverpoolmurders.blogspot.com
Cheers Joe.
lynne99
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Sun Apr 21, 2019 7:48 pm

Oh dear :( I bet the poor woman thought the baby would be ok. So sad. I think the gin might have damaged the baby before possible suffocation, let alone hunger and thirst and being shaken and banged around. Poor mite.
filsgreen
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Sun Apr 21, 2019 7:59 pm

Another example of the good old days. :(
Shelagh
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Tue Apr 23, 2019 12:55 am

Horrific end to the life of a new baby, the whole operation appears to be well thought out..
Jane Parker knocks on a strangers door, day before giving birth, stranger not only offers to help with deluvery but also offers home for three days, such a charitable lady, what’s the chances of finding a stranger just like that.
Local bobby (Much Hoole) notices that Jayne Parker is no longer pregnant but no sign of any baby.
Jane Parker’s parents and other family members would have noticed the absence of a new baby.
The woman was thirty three and according to Ancestry had two other children aged ten and five.
I’m sure Jane Parker would have been aware that she was putting the infant in danger by giving him gin and entombing him in a wooden trunk, then posting him off to heaven knows where..sheesh!!


This woman would have known that such actions were not only cruel, but guaranteed to kill the poor little mite!!

Very sad case Joe, thanks for all our reports :)
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fatboyjoe90
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Tue Apr 23, 2019 1:25 am

Brilliant replies from Lynne, Phil and Shelagh, with your detailed analysis, are you sure you weren't a detective in another life Shelagh?
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Thu Apr 25, 2019 11:29 am

Might have been, Joe, who knows :lol:

Don’t usually dig into reports (too depressing) but now and again, you read something that doesn’t quite sound right, so then try to make the pieces fit together.
Victim this time was a helpless infant, such cases are always disturbing, difficult to rationalise, hence reason for looking further.
Ancestry shows that mother of deceased infant continued living at family farm following her six month prison sentence!!

Shelagh :)
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fatboyjoe90
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Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:19 pm

Getting Away With Murder in Rodney Street.



A horrific murder and attempted suicide occurred in Rodney Street in 1836, the alleged killer never standing trial after the principal witness, who was also his daughter, disappeared from the face of the earth.

In the latter part of 1835 Sarah Diffin, a 17-year-old from Nottingham, left there to go into service in Manchester, working alongside 36-year-old Grace Avery, who had once been a servant to her family when they lived in London. Early the following year Grace went to Liverpool where she took up a position as a cook for Mr William Jones at 5 Rodney Street, with Sarah remaining in Manchester.

Grace's departure to Liverpool had coincided with Sarah's father William arriving in Manchester where he took a position in a druggists store. Grace had told Sarah her father had 'improper intentions' towards her, but she had no intention of reciprocating them. In the April Sarah joined Grace at 5 Rodney Street, being followed by her father who begged Grace to go away with him but she refused. There was no sign though of the horrors to follow as William appeared calm at the news.

5 Rodney Street.
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On the morning of Saturday 7th, May William visited the house and was let in by Grace, who allowed him into the ************ while she was working. Sarah came downstairs and saw him telling Grace that he would not take no for an answer and was staying there until she agreed to his demands. Grace went into the scullery to clean some candles and William went after her, remaining silent when questioned by Sarah. He paced around but was not drunk or angry, but after an hour he took out a pistol and fired it at Grace, who dropped dead instantly.

Sarah ran out and found a policeman within seconds but when they went back into the house William had managed to escape. However a search of the area beyond the back yard found the man in a near fainting condition, having taken prussic acid in an attempt to commit suicide. He was taken to the Infirmary where antidotes were administered and by 4pm he was fit to be discharged to the Bridewell.

During the inquest, which took place the following Monday morning, a communication was received that William had tried to hang himself at the Bridewell, but had been cut down before he expired. Sarah was the only witness and after hearing her deposition the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder, leading to the Coroner Philip Finch Curry committing him to trial at the assizes.

On 12th August William's case was adjourned due to Sarah not attending. The court was informed that Sarah had last been seen in Manchester on 12th July, where she told her employer that she had to return to Nottingham to sort out some financial affairs but would be back the following day. A subpoena had been issued but so far she had not been located, meaning William faced a further spell on remand at Kirkdale gaol.

With Sarah's whereabouts remaining unknown, the case was also adjourned the following April and again in August 1837, when William was granted bail at £200, to appear before the court when called upon. As enquiries continued into Sarah's disappearance, it transpired that when she left Manchester, it was with her uncle Thomas Calderaft, who was married to William's sister. He had been a frequent visitor to William at Kirkdale and the investigation then turned to Nottingham. It was established that Calderaft had told family members in July 1836 that it would not be pleasant for Sarah to give evidence against her father and he would take her away, and the pair disappeared around that time.

An indictment was made against William for 'having obstructed the course of justice by having spirited away or having removed from her place of residence a witness in a case of murder, in consequence of which the person charged could not be brought to justice or even trial.' This was heard at Liverpool assizes in April 1838, where Calderaft was found guilty in his absence. Neither him or Sarah were ever knowingly heard of again and William was never brought to justice.
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:36 pm

Unusual case - the only witness disappears and the murderer gets away scott free!
No justice for murder victim Grace Avery - so very sad.
“Sarah ran out and found a policeman within seconds” (no austerity back in 1836)

Thanks for another Liverpool murder case Joe :)
lynne99
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Wed May 01, 2019 9:47 am

Thanks for another gripping story. Very strange and I don't know what to make of it. I hope Sarah was alright and did not come to any harm.
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu May 02, 2019 2:19 am

Thanks for your comments Shelagh and Lynne, they are much appreciated. :wink:
Cheers Joe.
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu May 09, 2019 11:40 pm

A Walton Double Tragedy
A mother who cut the throats of her two young children was found guilty but insane.

34 Dunbartton Street as it is today.
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On 15th April 1933 the landlady of 34 Dumbarton Street, off County Road, heard moans coming from an upstairs room. on entering, she found 33-year-old Lilian Wright lying on the bed with a throat wound. Next to her were the dead bodies of her children Audrey (4) and Lawrence (2).

The bodies of the children were removed from the property on stretchers, while Lilian had her wound bandaged and was taken to the Stanley Hospital in a semi-conscious state. Lilian's husband William, a haulage contractor, returned home to be greeted with the terrible news and collapsed into the arms of neighbours. The family had only moved to Dumbarton Street four days earlier, as Lilian had felt isolated at their previous home in Mossley Hill and wanted to be nearer friends she had known since childhood.

Later that evening William was taken to see his wife in the hospital. She wrote him a note saying "Are Audrey and Lawrie dead? Please bury them in Church Road, near Dad. I would not leave them, I love them, bury me with them."

Lilian was transferred to Smithdown Road hospital and remained in a serious condition for five weeks. When she was finally discharged on 24th May, she as taken straight to the police court where she was charged with two murders and attempted suicide.

At the Assizes on 14th June, it was heard that William had been a kind and loving husband, but Lilian was convinced her eldest child would not survive and that she was being slowly poisoned. She was found guilty of murder but insane and ordered to be detained at His Majesty's Pleasure.






http://liverpoolmurders.blogspot.com
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Fri May 10, 2019 11:05 am

Heartbreaking case, Joe..The disturbed mother, obviously suffering mentally..so awfully sad!!
Feeling nothing but pity for this poor tragic family :cry:

(wouldn't want to be the resident of 34 Dunbarton Street)

Thanks Joe and to liverpoolmurders.blogspot.com :wink:
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fatboyjoe90
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Mon May 13, 2019 8:05 pm

Thanks for your comment’s Shelagh, I thought it was a very sad case also. Regarding the number of the street, they usually change them for the reason you mentioned.
Cheers Joe.
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fatboyjoe90
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Sat May 18, 2019 10:50 pm

Mother Starves Children To Death
In a horrific case in the 1850s a Vauxhall mother malnourished her children so much that two of them died from starvation leading to her being convicted of manslaughter.

Eldon Place as it is today.
Image

The situation came to light on the morning of Friday 24th August 1855 when 35-year-old Mary Aspinall called the police to her home in Eldon Place, claiming that two days earlier her husband, 42-year-old William had killed their 22-month-old daughter Emma, who was found dead in bed.


The scene at the property was horrendous, with the dead child in a skeletal state and six other children black from dirt and suffering malnutrition. Both parents were arrested and that night a second child, a four-month-old baby, died. The following day hundreds of people descended on the property to look at the conditions in which the children had been living.


The following week an inquest was held, with the Liverpool Mercury reporting that the parents had shown 'inhumanity unparalleled in the history of crime.' The jury of the coroner's court returned a verdict of wilful murder due to starvation arising out of gross negligence and both parents were committed for trial.


Of the six children that were placed in the care of the workhouse, two of them died before the trial took place in December when the prosecution reduced the charge to manslaughter. A neighbour told how they had often seen the children neglected while the mother was drunk and the couple's oldest son John, who worked with his father for the London & North Western Railway Company, said that they both handed their wages over to his mother.

Twelve-year-old William Aspinall told the court that his mother was often drunk and that he would be sent to get his own food, while the youngest children often had their food taken from them by the older ones. Both said though that when their father was around, he would ensure that all his family had something to eat.


The jury acquitted the father William but found mother Mary guilty of manslaughter and she was sentenced to two years imprisonment.





http://liverpoolmurders.blogspot.com.
Cheers Joe.
lynne99
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Wed May 22, 2019 7:42 am

And they say it is bad now a days. (Don't know if I have spelled that correctly.) Poor children. Thanks Joe
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fatboyjoe90
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Thu May 23, 2019 12:40 am

Hiya Lynne, I can't see anything wrong with it. Someone will always want to commit murder.
Cheers Joe.
Shelagh
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Thu May 23, 2019 11:49 pm

Awful situation for these poor children, their living conditions must have been horrendous..
Two year prison sentence for the manslaughter of two young children, found neglected and dying of starvation!
A suitable punishment for Mary Aspinal - starvation!

what a merciless end to life!

Joe, child poverty still rampant today, hundreds of thousands of food banks being used by desperate people up and down the country. There will always be inadequate parenting skills, and sad to say, very neglected and hungry children!

Interesting history, Thanks Joe!
filsgreen
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Fri May 24, 2019 10:09 am

Shelagh, your contention about child poverty does beg the question, is the child impoverished, or is it the parent?

It could be contended that the parent gets enough state benefit to feed themselves and not be dependent on food banks.

However, like the 140 year old story above, the parent is selfish and spends the money, which should be for food, on alcohol and probably cigarettes.

In the 1900s, Seebohm Rowntree (He of the fruit gum), contended, there was absolute poverty and relative poverty.

Absolute poverty states the person is too poor to feed or clothe themselves and relative poverty, is where they can feed and clothe themselves, but not to the standard of their neighbour, due to lack of money.

There are multiple reasons for this, unemployment, poor education, health, or if you delve further into sociology, accent and manner. Needless to say, parents find it hard to feed themselves and maintain their status in the community.

Coming from an impoverished town like Bootle, I think the majority of members have been unfortunate to have a basic upbringing, living hand to mouth and borrowing off neighbours to get to Thursday, when our parents would be paid.

Modern living is compounding the absolute/relative theory. Peer pressure is relentless these days, consequently, little Johnnie has to have the latest trainers or iPad. The parent provides these materialistic items, much to the detriment of the family.

As you've said, Shelagh, poor parenting or coping skills are part of the problem, but it could be contended that a family, living without societal pressure, could exist, and that's the operative word, on state benefits.
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