macdonalds

Join in here with our very own Bootle Chatterbox...

macdonalds

Postby Brunnyboy » Thu Mar 09, 2017 9:48 pm

got kids on my bus early in the morning eating junk food no wonder they are fat macdonalds should not be allowed to open till ten oclock
Brunnyboy
 
Posts: 1437
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:39 pm

Re: macdonalds

Postby Patricia » Fri Mar 10, 2017 1:31 am

WHAT!!! No home cooked breakfast!! Feel
the parents are to blame for that, don't you think?
User avatar
Patricia
 
Posts: 4195
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 10:00 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: macdonalds

Postby smoked out » Fri Mar 10, 2017 1:28 pm

Parents more than likely been out at work long long before children due out for school 2017 mummy and daddy both have to work to make ends meet , mummy stays at home mummy has any help in benefits sanctioned , no choice these days to stay and raise kids or work
Here for entertainment
smoked out
 
Posts: 1091
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 1:38 am

Re: macdonalds

Postby Patricia » Fri Mar 10, 2017 1:52 pm

Our children had parents that worked their entire lives
and always had a prepared breakfast. That is no excuse.
There is always cereal plus raisins or a banana that can be
placed in a bowl for each child and as they get older they
can fix themselves a couple of pieces of raisin or cinnamon
toast or boil an egg for goodness sake.
Don't you think that if they have the money for McDonalds then
they surely have the money to buy the above.
User avatar
Patricia
 
Posts: 4195
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 10:00 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: macdonalds

Postby Dott_of_8 » Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:40 pm

Hello all,

I think you are both right. We have the same problems and discussion here in Canada. McDonald's is just taking advantage of their market. Even so, parent's that are working to make ends meet are not excused from the responsibilities of rearing their children.

I believe that solutions to this problem must include McDonald's offering a healthy menu. Since parenting doesn't come with a manual, this issue is more sensitive and complicated (marital status, finances, knowing what a healthy diet is and being able to serve it, etc).

God Bless the Bootle Forum

Dott_of_8
User avatar
Dott_of_8
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 3:14 am

Re: macdonalds

Postby filsgreen » Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:58 pm

I can assume that you've never had sausage and egg on toast for breakfast then, Alan? McDonald's sell sausage and egg Macmuffin till 10am, let's not be too quick to judge the kids, eh mate.

Also, I agree with Smoked, there is a very good possibility that the parents of the children are at work. Long gone are the days when mother, or father would be at home making the children's breakfast.

On the subject of them getting fat, when I had a cooked breakfast as a kid, the eggs, bacon and sausage were all fried, oh, and let's not forget the fried bread, plus the toast dripping with butter :D I know which is the healthier breakfast of the two.
filsgreen
 
Posts: 1827
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 8:28 am

Re: macdonalds

Postby Brunnyboy » Fri Mar 10, 2017 6:17 pm

Never had bacon or sausage for breakfast had soft boiled egg with toast or cereal kids can't seem to do anything themselves the amount of fat kids these days is amazing and the parents are the same they never play out always on smartphones or tablets
Brunnyboy
 
Posts: 1437
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:39 pm

Re: macdonalds

Postby Shelagh » Fri Mar 10, 2017 8:22 pm

Lots of children with working parents in the fifties and sixties....
Warm porridge, toast, and a cuppa being the morning option at our house :roll:
Cooked breakfasts reserved for Sunday's and Holy day's :)

McDonalds....not as bad as some takeaway places, they use only British and Irish Beef, no additives, just salt and pepper!
Chicken menu consists of breast parts only, and all from responsible suppliers!
Their fish sustainably sourced and carries the official (MSC) eco label :)
All semi-skimmed milk used in teas, coffees and porridge is organic!
All eggs, free-range!
All potatoes british grown, fried in 100% vegetable oil which is non-hydrogenated!

Personally, wouldn't put foot in a McDonalds myself (never eat fried food) but grandchildren occasionally ask for a happy meal..don't like to refuse them, and they're certainly not fat :)
Don't think it does any harm to indulge now and again..

McDonalds do try to provide a healthy option I.e. bean burgers, fillet of fish etc..better still, if choice of a wholemeal bun was on the menu!
They will change certain products for you, instead of happy meal with fries, you can ask for happy meal with bag of fruit, and fresh orange or water instead of coke :)

The kids who get fat, are probably the ones who ride around on buses, consuming large amounts of burgers and get very little exercise!!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 1638
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 4:40 pm

Re: macdonalds

Postby smoked out » Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:13 am

cant say I have noticed loads of fat kids meself , I am wondering if the tales we hear from teachers at schools stating kids are turning up for school having had nothing to eat , affecting concentration levels , I have noticed lots of fat older people myself included .. leaving kids with instructions to boil kettle ,turn the gas on for toast or hot fat in pans , what age does that start then , Its all in the mind kids are never playing out when it suits us , tomorrow or the next day complaint will be they are out morning till night being a nuisance making noise or playing football in the streets.
Here for entertainment
smoked out
 
Posts: 1091
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 1:38 am

Re: macdonalds

Postby Brunnyboy » Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:01 am

I drive a bus pick kids up of a morning so many fat. Kids these days fat adults it's themselves to blame look at the amount of kids eating junk food drinking cans of sugar filled soft drinks I will not allow it in mine the grandkids have do without fat kids get bullied it's not fair on them
Brunnyboy
 
Posts: 1437
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:39 pm

Re: macdonalds

Postby lily8 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:29 am

Hi Al :D just by coincidence I was watching a re run interview with Sir Michael Marmot on the ABC he studies the social aspects of eating so called 'fast food' among other things and was really interested in what his studies found. I don't know if this link will work in the UK. It would seem that fast food outlets particularly target the most poor areas to locate their stores

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-15/o ... ot/7849750




Professor Sir Michael Marmot
Sunday 15 August 2010 09.04 AEST
Professor Steve Field says it is up to individuals to take responsibility for their own health. I agree. Except that insight does not provide much of a guide to knowing what to do. The evidence suggests that simply telling people to behave more responsibly is no more likely to be effective than telling someone who is depressed to pull his socks up.
Nor does a focus on individual responsibility take us far in understanding the health problems we face as a nation. A striking feature of smoking and obesity is their close link with people's socioeconomic position: the lower their status the more likely are people to be obese and to smoke. Suppose you were tempted to think that the poor are simply irresponsible. How would that explain why among people who work hard in stable jobs, those with less education are more likely to smoke?

In my review of health inequalities, Fair Society, Healthy Lives, we drew attention not only to the causes of ill-health but to the causes of the causes. Smoking, obesity and heavy drinking are causes of ill-health, but what are the causes of these behaviours?
The behavioural choices we make as individuals are rooted in our social and economic circumstances. People born into more advantageous situations find it easier to adopt healthy lifestyles and give up unhealthy behaviour.
Such differences are part of the explanation for the striking social differences in health. For example, in England, there is a finely graded relation between the affluence of a neighbourhood and healthy life expectancy. Systematic differences in health cannot be attributed to genetic make-up, lack of personal responsibility or difficulties in access to medical care. They are linked to the conditions in which we are born, grow, live, work and age.
Rather than simple exhortations to behave better, we need to address these more fundamental causes of ill-health. That does not mean there is nothing to be done in the short term. In my review, we drew on the evidence of the success of interventions at population level to prevent people from starting smoking and helping them to quit: smoking bans, reducing smuggling, restricting advertising and placement, workplace interventions, group therapy, counselling, self-help materials, nicotine replacement therapy and social support, and abolishing prescription charges for nicotine-replacement therapy.
Professor Field emphasises, rightly, the role of GPs. There are impressive examples of GPs putting their actions in the context of the lives people are able to lead. The Bromley by Bow Centre promotes healthy lifestyles to individuals living in deprived areas of east London by offering a range of innovative services on one site, including a GP surgery, adult education, children's centre, art classes and advice on issues such as housing, benefits and employment. It takes a holistic approach to improving health by working in a social partnership to increase employment, skills, social capital and integration, and therefore helping people to have control over their lives.
We must dispose of a false opposition: the nanny state against individual freedom. It is up to individuals to make choices that will influence their health. But individuals will only be able to change behaviour through choice if they have control over their lives and that requires creating the conditions to allow them to do so.
Put simply, childhood deprivation, the stress of poverty, overcrowding, living in a run-down area, feeling powerless at work and being unemployed do not give people the control over their lives that fosters good health and enables them to succeed in making difficult changes in behaviour.

Lily
lily8
 
Posts: 10880
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:57 am
Location: Far North Queensland Australia

Re: macdonalds

Postby Patricia » Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:49 pm

I totally agree with you, Lily, however, I would venture to say this also applies to ALL Fast Food
Businesses, including the beloved Fish & Chip Shops. When anybody starts a business
the first thing they want is a "Profit" and sadly that is never going to change, which is all
part of "Life's rich pattern!" As Sir Marmot stated, it falls on basic education and the individual's
will to change the way they live, which of course, would be extremely difficult if they are
living on or below the poverty level.

I hate to sound negative but we are now in the Twenty-First century and poverty is
still with us, I doubt it is ever going to change but like your sincere and many good deeds,
we can each do our part to help with this situation. I regularly donate food to the Church to
be given to the poor and needy and money and clothing to the Sally Army.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/201 ... reas-of-uk
User avatar
Patricia
 
Posts: 4195
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 10:00 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: macdonalds

Postby graham » Fri Mar 17, 2017 4:52 am

Most of the kids of today are fat because they are sitting on their rear ends playing with their phones. My two sons drank pop etc but they played sports and neither were ever fat. I have four grandsons, three play soccer and other sports, the other grandson was not good at soccer or baseball but took up track & field and is the fastest boy for his age in BC over 100 200 300 meters and he is not fat. I watch a lot of soccer following my grandsons and can honestly I have only seen a few fat boys play, and, incidentally they had fat parents, so life was going to be hard for them to lose weight. Some parents so it is expensive putting kids into sport and I agree but I wonder how many parents say that and both smoke and drink.
When we were kids my mother would say go and play outside which we did either in the road or Derby Park spent hours fishing in the lake for tiddlers. My fishing rod was a stick with a line of cotton, the weight was a button and the float was a matchstick, spent ages getting little red worms or whatever out of the black mud and attach them to the line. good times
graham
 
Posts: 177
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 3:55 am
Location: Canada


Return to Chat about anything with the Bootle Bucks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests