Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Your place to talk about your Bootle memories

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:28 am

Such a sad case, don't think anyone could pass judgement on the mother of Alice, the circumstances were impossible to contemplate!
Coroner, Samuel Brighouse, seemed to be a very principled man!

Thanks for another interesting story, Joe!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Sat Oct 07, 2017 10:25 pm

Thanks for your comments Phil and Shelagh, they are much appreciated. :wink:
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Sat Oct 07, 2017 10:29 pm

Cholera, Murder and Attempted Suicide
A grief stricken man whose wife and daughter died of cholera killed his two other children before attempting suicide himself.

Patrick Culkin was a schoolmaster from Carlow in Ireland who like many others, fled the famine in the 1840s and settled in Liverpool with his wife and three children. Unable to find work, thirty four year old Patrick fell upon hard times and was forced to seek parish relief to feed his family.

On the morning of Wednesday 1st August 1849 seven year old Sarah Culkin died of cholera at the family's home in a court off Oriel Street, Vauxhall. The following day Mrs Culkin died of the same disease. A neighbour named Jane Kane did what she could to help, but Patrick said he could not live without his wife and refused to even accept a cup of tea.

Image Oriel Street as it is today.



On the Friday afternoon Jane went to see how Patrick was and found the door locked. With the help of neighbours, she got in through a window and found Patrick lying on the bed with his arm around the body of his wife. He was barely alive and on another bed were the dead bodies eight year old James and eleven month old Catherine, their throats cut.

Patrick was taken to the Northern Hospital in a state of semi consciousness, calling out on the way to God so that he could be taken to his wife and children. The four bodies were examined by a local surgeon, Dr Kilner. Sarah and her mother had been laid out as if for burial, while the two other children had been dead for some hours, their throats cut from one end to the other.

The inquest took place on 6th August before the borough coroner Mr P F Curry. Mrs Cain told how Patrick had been a loving husband and father but his mood changed immediately with the death of his wife and he said he would never again eat meat in this world. Dr Kilner said that the throat wounds could not have been self inflicted.

Another neighbour Ellen Bent recalled how on the day of his wife's death Patrick had said he could not live any longer and that she should not be alarmed if she read anything bad about him on the papers. On the morning of the killings, Patrick told her how he had been to the Harp pub on Vauxhall Road and been given wine and brandy by the landlord as charity.

Mr Lea from the parish recalled that on the Thursday he had gone to the house and saw Sarah's body lying on the table and Patrick and his two remaining children on the bed next to the corpse of his wife. Mr Lea told him to get up as it was dangerous to lie next to a dead body and that he would arrange for the interment. When he returned that evening with some food, Patrick said that he was awaiting some money from his sister in the Isle of Man and would arrange the burials himself. Mr Lea told the Coroner that he did not fear for Patrick's welfare and apart from the ordinary dejection resulting from his loss, there was nothing unusual in his manner.

As Mr Curry was about to sum up, a female stepped forward to say that Patrick was a friend of her husband and had visited their house in Hanover Street on the Thursday night. She was ordered to give her evidence on oath and testified that Patrick had told them he had lost two of his closest friends and if he said more it would lead to astonishment. The female said she was of the opinion Patrick was of unsound mind at the time.

The Coroner told the jury that they were unable to determine on Patrick's state of mind, that was for the assizes to decide. Referring to it as a 'most frightful case' he said that the only verdict they could return was one of wilful murder against Patrick, who was described by the Liverpool Mail as of 'superior attainment' and well respected in his neighbourhood.

The assizes were due to start just two days later but with Patrick still in hospital under police supervision his case could not be heard. It was another month before he was discharged to Kirkdale gaol to await his trial which took place on 14th December. On being asked to enter a plea, he replied 'I am not conscious of having done it, surrounded with death as I was, my poor wife and daughter - my favourites.' A plea of not guilty was recorded and as was customary at the time, Patrick was tried only for the murder of one of the victims, his daughter Catherine.

For the prosecution, Mr James described the case as 'the most heartrending and painful'. He told the jury that he would simply relay the facts and let them decide as to Patrick's state of mind. Patrick was described as someone of 'kindness and affection' who had fallen into 'extreme destitution'. Mr James went on to say that the cholera had taken many in Liverpool and the Kingdom that autumn and this led to Patrick telling others he could not survive his loss. He told the jury that the only decision they had to make was as to the state of mind of Patrick at the time of the killings.

Jane Cain and Mrs Bent were both called to give evidence about the events in the immediate aftermaths of the deaths of Patrick's wife and eldest daughter. Jane said that Patrick had been talking to the corpses as if they were still alive and even opened Sarah's eyes. Mrs Bent described him as deranged and a doctor from the Northern Hospital felt he was not of sound mind from the time of admission.

Mr Justice Wightman summed up by saying that this was one of the most lamentable and painful that had ever come before a court. He asked the jury to set aside feeling and instead decide if Patrick could distinguish between right and wrong at the time of the killings. If they believed that the distress of mind, coupled with lack of sleep and food, had made the mind so unsettled then a verdict of insanity could be returned. On the other hand, if they felt that Patrick was sane then they would have to find him guilty of murder, no matter how painful that could be.

It took just a few minutes deliberation for the jury to acquit Patrick on the grounds of insanity. He was then detained until Her Majesty's pleasure be known.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby filsgreen » Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:38 pm

Good grief Joe, these stories get grimmer. :(
filsgreen
 
Posts: 2227
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 7:28 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:22 pm

Joe, without doubt, the saddest story yet (won't call it a murder) too tragic for that, how utterly dreadful for that family :cry:
Conditions in those courts "Vauxhall" not fit for human inhabitation, hardly surprising, people dropping dead of cholera and other diseases..no wonder the poor man lost his mind!!
Sad end to a loving family!!

Thanks for sharing the history, Joe!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby lynne99 » Mon Oct 09, 2017 10:40 am

I agree with the others so sad. Thanks for the history. Do we have a map as to where Oriel Road was. Was it near Gascoyne st?
lynne99
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:55 pm
Location: Rugby

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:27 am

There you go, Lynne, as requested. :wink:

Image
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby lynne99 » Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:53 pm

You spoil me Joe. I did not realise that cholera was so near to where my family lived. I suppose Gascoyne st had a different tap, because I don't recall any of mine dying from cholera in Liverpool.
lynne99
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:55 pm
Location: Rugby

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:58 pm

Your welcome Lynne. :wink: :)
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:58 pm

Thanks for your kind comments Phil, Shelagh and Lynne. :wink: :)
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:05 pm

Runaway Boy Beaten to Death
A boy who tried to run away from home was beaten so severely by his father that he died from his injuries.

On 5th October 1887 Ann Murphy, who lived in Paget Street (off Boundary Street, where Beers Timber supplies is now), heard the son of a family who lodged with her screaming 'Father don't beat me I won't stop out anymore.'

Ann, a shoemakers wife, went next door to fetch the boy's mother. When they both returned his father Thomas Lazarus had gone out but tied the door so that his son, seven year old Edward, could not leave the room. His mother opened the door and took him to the Northern Hospital due to his distressed state. When he was undressed, his body was covered in bruises and he also had an open wound on his shin.
The Northern Hosptital.
Image

Edward remained in hospital and grew weaker in the coming days. On 15th October Thomas was apprehended by police at Nelson Dock where he worked as a labourer. He was taken to the hospital to witness his son make a deposition, in which Edward stated that he had been beaten with a strap. When Thomas was taken to the bridewell and charged with assault he replied 'I have nothing to say.'
Image

On 23rd October Edward died with his mother by his side. A postmortem determined that he had died as a result of blood poisoning, caused by an abscess from a bruise on the thigh.


An inquest took place two days later before the Coroner, Clarke Aspinall. Ann Murphy said that she was aware Edward had been brought home by the police earlier on the day in question, the fifth time in three weeks that this had happened. Dr Fisher, one of two doctors who carried out the postmortem, gave his opinion that considerable violence had been used and described four thick parallel strokes on Edward's back that were similar to what would be expected from a strap. The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter and Thomas was committed to trial at the assizes on a coroner's warrant.

Thomas appeared before Mr Justice Day on 14th November. He was found guilty of manslaughter but recommended to mercy by the jury. In sentencing Justice Day renowned for his tough sentences, said he could see no grounds for the jury's recommendation. He then sentenced Thomas to eighteen months imprisonment.

Whilst Thomas was in jail his wife gave birth to another child, Jeremiah, and on his release he took up employment as a marine fireman.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:44 pm

Dreadful, Joe, hate any form of violence, especially when it's used against a child,,
Seems that some of the fathers back then were very cruel, reminds me of "Her Benny"
Thanks for story Joe!!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:32 pm

Thanks for your comment Shelagh i don't think you have to go that far back, when fathers used to leather their offspring. :x
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:16 pm

Brave Passer by Stops Killers Escape

A man who stabbed another drinker who had made inappropriate remarks about his friend's wife tried to flee the scene but hadn't bargained for a woman who refused to let him get away.

Langdale Street As it is Today.
Image

On Friday 19th December 1879 Hugh Knight, a forty-year-old journeyman saddler who lived in Langsdale Street in Everton, spent the evening drinking in the Great Eastern pub in nearby Canterbury Street. Whilst there he made some offensive marks about the wife of James Page, who was also in the pub, but further, no words were exchanged between the two.

Canterbury Street.As it is Today.
Image

The following night at around 10 pm Page went in the pub with two other men, William Martin and Edward Ashcroft. All three were too intoxicated for the barman to serve them and as a peace offering, Knight attempted to shake hands with Page and apologise for his words of the previous evening. Page though raised a clenched fist and replied 'I have got this for you tonight.'



A few moments later Knight left the pub and was jumped on by Ashcroft, who throttled him around the neck and threw him onto the floor. he followed this up with two kicks in the side as Knight lay on his back and Martin then kicked him in the legs but Page did nothing. A passer by named Mrs Grimes shouted to Ashcroft that he had killed a man but he shouted back 'You cow I will kill you too.' He then lifted Knight's head up and knocked it back down onto the pavement.

All three men walked away but Mrs Grimes followed them, leading to Ashcroft kicking her. This was a bad move as she then struck him three or four times with her basket and the commotion allowed police to arrive and apprehend them. Knight was taken by two policemen to the house of Dr Rutherford at 155 Islington but he was pronounced dead on arrival. A post-mortem revealed that he had died of effusion of blood at the base of the brain.

After an inquest returned a verdict of wilful murder against all three men they stood trial at the Liverpool assizes on 10th February 1880. Charges against page were immediately dropped, then after hearing the evidence, the defence said Martin could only be proved to have kicked Knight in the thigh. Accepting that Ashcroft was the main instigator, his counsel said it was a brawl and as no weapon was used then it should be a case of manslaughter, not murder.

Lord Chief justice Coleridge.
Image

After the jury acquitted Martin but convicted Ashcroft of manslaughter Lord Chief Justice Coleridge was damning with his sentencing remarks. He told the 38-year-old caster that his extreme brutality and deadly spirit might have justified a murder verdict. Saying that he needed to show others what he thought of such brutality in a civilised country, a sentence of twenty years penal servitude was then imposed. The judge also directed that Mrs Grimes should be paid a £5 reward for her courage and bravery.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Prime Minister Assassinated By Liverpool Man.

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:26 pm

The only British Prime Minister ever to be assassinated was Spencer Perceval, who was gunned down by Liverpool man John Bellingham on 11th May 1812.

John Bellingham
Image


Bellingham lived in Duke Street and was a businessman involved in exporting timber to Russia but he lost everything when a buyer went bankrupt. Unable to pay off his debts, Bellingham found himself in prison. On release, he went to Russia to complain about the situation and was imprisoned there too. Despite writing to the British ambassador pleading for release, red tape ensured he stayed there for months. When he finally came home, he sought compensation by writing to his MP and the Prince Regent, but nothing came of this.

Spencer Perceval
Image


Bellingham decided to act by shooting the Prime Minister, making several visits to the House of Commons to plot his crime. He bought two pistols from a shop in London and on 11th May he shot Perceval dead as he entered the Commons lobby in full view of several witnesses. Bellingham was recognised by Liverpool MPs Banastre Tarleton and Bamber Gascoyne and immediately restrained and disarmed.

Bellingham was taken to Newgate prison where he retained a cheery persona. He was tried just four days later, his pleas that he needed more time to prepare a defence being dismissed. He made along statement pleading his grievances but the jury took only 15 minutes to find him guilty. The judge sentenced him to death, decreeing that he had known what he was doing and was not insane. Three days after this, he was hanged in public and his body taken away for dissection at St Bartholomews Hospital. Perceval was buried in a family vault at St Luke's Church in Charlton, South East London.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:36 pm

John Bellingham, that's a name we shall now remember...assassination of a British Prime Minister..WOW!!
This buissnessman seemed to have a bit of a rough deal...but to murder a P.M. in cold blood :shock:

Thanks for the story Joe!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby filsgreen » Mon Oct 23, 2017 11:55 pm

That one is always a good quiz question Joe, thanks for posting.
filsgreen
 
Posts: 2227
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 7:28 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:42 pm

Spanish Sailor Stabbed to Death
In 1884 a foreign sailor was stabbed and kicked to death in a horrific gang attack in Kirkdale. The main culprit, 18 year old Michael McLean was hanged for murder in an execution noted for the incompetence and drunkenness of the hangman.



Image
Canada Dock as it is today.




At 10pm on 5th January 1884 Exequiel Nunez and Jose Jiminez, whose ships were berthed in Canada Dock, were walking along Regent Road when they encountered a gang of five youths on the corner with Blackstone Street. Along with five foot four inches tall gang leader McLean were Patrick Duggan, Alexander Campbell, Murdoch Ballantyne and William Dempsey, who were aged between 18 and 20. Ballantyne punched Jiminez without warning but he managed to escape and went to seek help as his friend remained at the mercy of the gang.

Image
Fulton Street as it is to day.

After being punched and kicked Nunez managed to get away as well only to be caught up with the gang by Fulton Street where he was beaten and kicked. Again he escaped but only as far as the bridge on Blackstone Street, where he was stabbed in the neck. Watched by quite a crowd the killers dispersed and after a horse ambulance was sent for Nunez died on the way to hospital. It took six days for Nunez’s identity to be confirmed, as Jiminez was fearful of approaching police in case he was detained and missed his ship or was wrongly charged with murder.

Image
Blackstone Street Bridge.

Due to their notoriety in the neighbourhood all five youths were arrested within days. McLean, who was from Steel Street, was apprehended at a house in Fulton Street with his girlfriend and found in possession of two blades, one of which was bloodstained. The trial, which took place on 18th February, saw conflicting evidence as all five tried to minimise their own involvement. As such Ballantyne, Dempsey and Campbell were all acquitted as the evidence against them was inconclusive, but McLean and Duggan were found guilty with a recommendation for mercy. Before the sentence of death was passed, both said that Dempsey was the real murderer.

Eventually Duggan was granted a reprieve on the grounds that he had not carried out the stabbing but despite his youth McLean’s execution was fixed for 10th March. The hangman Bartholomew Binns arrived two days beforehand drunk and fell asleep straight away, before shouting abuse at prison officers who tried to wake him, leading to the Governor calling the police to calm him down. Binns also expressed disapproval at the presence of Samuel Heath as reserve executioner, as he felt that the prison officials wanted to use him instead. Heath was meant to assist Binns but the latter refused to allow him to do so.



As he climbed onto the gallows, McLean maintained his and Duggans innocence, telling the three reporters who were present: 'Gentlemen, I consider it is a disgrace to the police force of Liverpool and to the law of the country that I am going to suffer death and another boy is going to suffer imprisonment for life for a crime of which we are both innocent, as God is my judge.' He then recited prayers with Father Bonte, but a nervous Binns then made a mess of placing the noose and hood over McLean's head and miscalculated the drop, meaning that although he lost consciousness immediately he continued to have a pulse for 8 minutes. Dempsey, who McLean had blamed for the murder, had sailed for a new life in San Francisco the previous week.

After the execution Binns attended the inquest where he was censured by the Coroner and claimed to have fallen asleep on the Saturday as he had been up all night tending to his sick wife. He then took a cab to Lime Street, via some public houses where he showed interested customers his rope. He was so drunk that he was nearly denied boarding onto his train back to Yorkshire. It was the last execution that he was invited by the Home Office to perform.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby efc46 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:26 am

again Joe thanks what a story rings through mind why how easy it is to gang up on anyone
Davey Rowlands Bootle
User avatar
efc46
 
Posts: 222
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 3:40 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby filsgreen » Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:26 am

Thanks for posting, Joe. Just shows that there has always been cowardly scum in Liverpool.
filsgreen
 
Posts: 2227
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 7:28 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby efc46 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:35 am

yes Joe I was in bootle police station (never got charged with anything )the night Tommy Mckeown got the kicking that cost him his life your story brought it all back
Davey Rowlands Bootle
User avatar
efc46
 
Posts: 222
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 3:40 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Wed Nov 01, 2017 10:42 am

Thanks Joe, what a horrendous ordeal for those two seamen, there's a book "Gangs of Liverpool" contains the names of all these violent criminals..
Very sad case!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 11:58 pm

Thanks for your kind comments Davey, Phil and Shelagh they are much appreciated. :wink: :)
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby lynne99 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:06 am

Why did a crowd watch and do nothing?? Surely if there were enough of then they could have done something. Thanks Joe.
lynne99
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:55 pm
Location: Rugby

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Sat Nov 04, 2017 2:48 am

A man killed his sister in Kensington after she refused him permission to pawn a shirt.

On the afternoon of Monday 27th, February 1899 Jane Canning went on an errand and returned to her home in Houlton Street, Kensington. She found her seventeen-year-old daughter Ada lying on the landing, having been battered about the head. She was barely alive, her injuries were so bad that part of her brain protruded.

Jane's 25-year-old son James, who just half an hour earlier had been quietly sat by the fire, was nowhere to be seen and the backdoor and gate were open.

James was located a few hours later in a nearby pub by his brother and admitted hitting Ada several times. The following morning Ada succumbed to her injuries, which included a fractured skull and James was arrested.

On being taken into custody James told officers 'I struck her on the head with a poker, you see what drink does for me. Thank God I did not use a knife, I did not mean to kill her. James had recently been discharged from the army for striking an officer and spent most of his time drinking, in between occasional labouring jobs.

James appeared at the police court on the afternoon of his arrest and was remanded in custody. At the coroner's inquest, a verdict of wilful murder was returned after the brother's evidence was heard.

On 1st May James appeared before the assizes where the jury heard how he had tried to pawn a shirt on the fateful day, but Ada tried to stop him. His mother Jane broke down several times while testifying, saying that he normally adored Ada. The police officer who made the arrest said that James had told him he loved his sister.

In the closing speech, James' defence counsel pleaded that due to his drunkenness his state of mind was not as it should have been. In summing up though, the judge said that his drunken state was his own doing. However, he also pointed out that there had been no previous quarrel and he did not appear to have intended to kill.

Image
judge, Mr Justice Ridley,
James was found guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter without the jury leaving their box. However, the judge, Mr Justice Ridley, showed no leniency, referring to the circumstances of his army discharge as an indication of his character. He then imposed a sentence of fourteen years penal servitude.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby lynne99 » Sat Nov 04, 2017 8:47 am

Thanks again Joe. How sad for the whole family. Drink can make some people do terrible things. :(
lynne99
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:55 pm
Location: Rugby

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Sat Nov 04, 2017 12:35 pm

Tragic death of a young girl, murdered by her own brother!
Judging by previous offence committed when in the army, sounds like the man already had a violent streak.. struck an officer!!
Knocked his younger sisters brains out with a poker, left her there on the floor, then said in court "Thank God I didn't use a knife" (making out he never meant to kill her) What an evil monster!!

Thanks for story Joe!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby filsgreen » Sat Nov 04, 2017 1:30 pm

If you look at the timeline, it could be argued that her brother was suffering from PTSD or shell shock, after being discharged from the Army. At that time, it was only just being recognised. To hit an officer is nothing in the great scheme of things. To be an officer all you had to have was a grammar school education, or rise up through the ranks. They could be sadistic and the "hit" could have been a slight tap or touch. The violent streak was nurtured after being in the Army and trained to kill and maim people for a living, at possibly no choice of his own. His use of alcohol would have diminished the self control he had of this possible violent streak, unfortunately his sister was killed, possibly due to this. No talk of psychiatric reports, what other reason was given for stoving his sister's head in? Of course all of this is supposition, but you can't take the paper's report at face value. At the end of the day, the judge decided that he did not murder his sister, the verdict was manslaughter.
filsgreen
 
Posts: 2227
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 7:28 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:13 am

Phil, this is a good example of how difficult it can be for a jury to reach a decision!

Must be very difficult in a case where each juror views the evidence differently!
No jury needed in this particular case, as "Mr Justice Ridley" (we've come across him before) decided that James Canning was guilty of manslaughter!

Reason for army discharge, not taken into account by a very unbiased judge!
So, in my opinion, the accused received a very fair trial!

James Canning's sister, Ada, didn't receive any such justice, regarding her fatal, untimely death (seventeen) head bludgeoned with a poker, body found on the landing (probably trying to escape the murderer)
Strange, according to the mother, James Canning had been sitting quietly by the fire at the time of her leaving the house, then suddenly he changes into 'poker wielding monster' leaving poor Ada to lay dying on the floor, ha slopes out of the back door, making for the nearest ale house, then protests, "the drink made me do it"
Seems to me, that no remorse was shown, just the actions of a coward attempting to save his own skin!!

This murder may have been committed 130 years ago, and it might not seem relevant to some, but for the sake of justice and the victim, it STILL matters...
a life is a life..no matter how long ago it was taken!!

Good to have another perspective, Phil :)

Shelagh!!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:58 pm

Thanks for your kind comments Lynne, Shelagh and Phil. :wink: :)
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:02 am

Wife Battered in Parlour

In 1881 Everton man Joseph McEntee was hanged for killing his wife, whose body was found by fellow tenants whilst he went on the run.

Joseph, who worked as a tailor, lived with his wife Ellen (aged 50) in a three-storey house at 89 Rose Place, occupying the parlour and top storey. Another family named the Penningtons rented the first floor.

Image
Rose Place back in the day.

On the morning of 5th April 1881 one of the Pennington children, a little girl came downstairs and found a blood-soaked rag on the floor and noticed that the parlour door handle was missing. She then looked through the keyhole and saw the corpse of Ellen, but was told off by her mother for being nosey. However when Martha Pennington went down herself she looked and could only see the prisoner, but when he went out she opened the door using a stick and found the battered body of Ellen.

The police and a doctor were called, who ascertained that there were five stab wounds on the body and that the death had probably occurred the night before. A niece of Ellen came forward to say that she had called to see her at 10 pm and Joseph had been evasive as to her whereabouts and had appeared to step over something as he answered the door.

A description of Joseph was circulated around police stations and he was arrested that night in Garston in a drunken state, having pawned a watch there for 30 shillings. Although he had had his moustache and beard shaved off a police constable noticed the blood on his hands and boots, which were matted with hair. When he was searched he was found to have a door knob in his pocket and was reported to have said 'its all through drink' as he was arrested.

At his trial on 10th May, witnesses acknowledged that although the couple was known to drink heavily, they were not renowned for quarrelling and that Joseph had always provided well for Ellen. His defence counsel claimed that he had returned home to find Ellen murdered and been so bewildered that he just wandered about drinking in an aimless manner. In his summing up, Mr Justice Mathew stated that the defence had acknowledged that a murder had taken place and it was simply up to the jury to decide if the circumstantial evidence pointed to Joseph as the killer. After retiring for 20 minutes they returned a verdict of guilty.

When asked if he had anything to say, Joseph replied 'Its no use now I have been found guilty.' After being sentenced to death Joseph shook hands with his counsel and was taken down to the cells. Although his solicitors tried for a reprieve on the grounds that Joseph had no murderous intent this was refused. He was hanged at Kirkdale Gaol on 31st May, a crowd of several hundred gathering outside the walls. The thud of the 'drop' was clearly heard outside and one woman in the crowd wept bitterly, saying she had known him since he was a boy and he hadn't meant it.
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby Shelagh » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:27 am

Another interesting case, Joe,
The accused had pawned his watch for thirty shillings, (a lot of money back then) expensive watch..must have made a decent income from his tailoring business!
Shame, the little girl had to witness such a scene...murdered corpse, not something you would easily forget :shock:

Thanks Joe!
Shelagh
 
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby everliver » Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:16 am

Joe Fantastic keep them coming really enjoy this post.

Regards Bobby
everliver
 
Posts: 437
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 10:20 am

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby lynne99 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:24 pm

As do I Bobby, look forward to every post. Thanks Joe
lynne99
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:55 pm
Location: Rugby

Re: Murder - Crimes - History - Bootle and North Liverpool

Postby fatboyjoe90 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:46 pm

Thanks for your kind comments Shelagh, Bob and Lynne, they are much appreciated. :wink: :)
Cheers Joe.
User avatar
fatboyjoe90
 
Posts: 3066
Joined: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: merseyside

PreviousNext

Return to Talk about the History of Bootle here

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest